FBCLID Query Parameters in Google Analytics

FBCLID was, briefly, the bane of my existence. Like you, I got into this post because I was seeing some strange traffic in a few of my Google Analytics properties. I like a very clean, easy-to-read dashboard when I’m doing my web analytics. Too many query parameters starts to fragment the reporting and make it unusable.

What is FBCLID?

When websites want to track users from their site across the web, they’ll often include a Click ID to associate with a user. Google has done this for a while with Google Ads and the GCLID query parameter. FBCLID stands for Facebook Click ID, and it’s how Facebook tracks clicks on links, and potentially event tracks users across the web. As browser trends lean toward a world without cookies, big web companies like Facebook are looking for new ways to continue their analytics across a user journey. Intelligent Tracking Prevention 2.2 is aiming to prevent the use of Click IDs for cookie extension, so these may or may not plague you for much longer.

How to Remove FBCLID From Google Analytics Reports

Removing FBCLID from Google Analytics is super easy to do. First, though, I highly recommend making sure you have a Filtered View for your Google Analytics property. You don’t want to use you raw master view when you filter GA data, because you risk losing a backup should something go wrong.

exclude fbclid url query parameters

Once you’ve got your Filter View set up, go the View Setting in the Admin console. There, you’ll find a box titled “Exclude URL Query Parameters.” In this box, type fbclid. You can also include other rogue Query Parameters in this box, comma separated.

Other URL Parameters

Not all query parameters deserve the left foot of fellowship, though. UTM Parameters, for instance, have a specific use in Google Analytics (but you probably won’t see them in your reports). Other query parameters act as Search identifiers, and can be leveraged into better data. Read more about cleaning url query parameters in Google Analytics reports.

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